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core curriculum handout detail

WHAT’S NEXT? HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: PREPARATION FOR 15 MINUTE MUSICAL LAUNCH ASSIGNMENT

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU AT NMI?

New Musicals Inc. (and the Academy for New Musical Theatre) has many programs and opportunities, and we know that the possibilities ahead after your Core Curriculum year can be confusing to understand.

Briefly – if you continue with NMI next season, you will be asked to participate in our Fringe Curriculum and write a 30-40 minute musical by April of next year, which will have the possibility of produced at the Hollywood Fringe Festival. You would be considered a “Member” of NMI, and the cost of your second year would be $800 (billed in quarterly installments of $200). As a Member of NMI, you would also be asked to contribute eight hours of volunteer service during each season (more info on this later in this memo).

The rest of this memo will go into more detail about all the points made above, as well as provide additional info about other opportunities, and on-going opportunities after your second year with us.


EVALUATIONS OF CORE PARTICIPANTS
Writers who complete the Core Curriculum (including the 15 Minute Musicals) and at least one craft Lab will be evaluated by the staff at an end-of-year meeting (to be scheduled). This evaluation will have one of two possible outcomes:

1. The evaluated writer is invited to become a Member of NMI, entitled to all the rights and privileges thereof.
2. The evaluated writer is not invited to become a Member of NMI, in which case:
- The evaluated writer is invited to repeat the Core Curriculum; or
- The evaluated writer is encouraged to seek further education in music, playwrighting, lyric writing (including basic poetics); or
- The evaluated writer is advised that there is not a good fit between his or her approach to the crafts and NMI.


FRINGE CURRICULUM
In the first year of Membership (after successfully completing the Core Curriculum and a 15 Minute Musical), writers can spend a season in the FRINGE CURRICULUM, working on a 30-40 minute, under a set of deadlines. You will write three drafts of your musical between September and April, with the possibility of having your show produced at the Hollywood Fringe Festival in June.

Meetings will consist of one group session per month (on a Saturday morning from 10am to 2pm) and various Monday evening sessions which make use of the members of the Academy Repertory Company to present the material and allow for ongoing feedback.

Teams will be formed prior to the first session in September (to give a head start on the outline); and will be expected to meet all the writing deadlines for the phases of the project. All teams that are able to turn in a First Draft by the January session will be guaranteed a (low-budget) production as part of the Hollywood Fringe Festival in June. (Each Fringe production evening will likely consist of two 30-40 minute musicals in a 90-minute Fringe presentation slot.)

February and March sessions will be dedicated to the presentations of Second Drafts. A final draft will be due in April; it’s this draft which will go into rehearsal.

Details about the process and the schedule are below.

Collaborators: Pick your own collaborators, or let us help you find a team…your choice. Ideally, start teaming up now around the pitches that were made by your colleagues in January.

Timeframe: Monthly meetings and assessment sessions from September through April. Rehearsals in May for June productions at the Hollywood Fringe Festival.

Topic: You may write about anything you like – even a shorter version of a full-length musical you’re contemplating for the future – but we are encouraging the use of stories/ideas in the public domain so you are starting with a solid structure.

Parameters: No parameter requirements. (You’re welcome.)

Filming: YES!, we’ll film these shows. We’ll be casting non-Union actors.

Guaranteed Production: We’ll guarantee production for every team that finishes a VIABLE First Draft by the January deadline. NOTE that NMI reserves the right to decide what “viable” means, but essentially it means a show that we can all be proud of.

Length: 30-40 minutes…but we won’t be sticklers…so long as we can get at least two shows into a single 90-minute Fringe slot.

Cast size: 4-10. We will likely cast each show separately, to include as many actors as we can!

Props/costumes. YES! You can have props and costumes if you provide them, and they take fewer than five minutes of set-up time.

Copies: Each team would also be responsible for copies for each of the drafts.

Tickets: Each writer would be responsible for selling a minimum of ten tickets to your final production (likely $15 per ticket).

Volunteer Shifts: You are obligated to help out a minimum of two shifts hours during production months of May and June: ushering, box office, running lights, etc.

Authors’ Royalties. Authors share 6% of the gross box office receipts.

Future Rights. You own your show; we won’t be expecting any ownership in these shows.

The fee for the Fringe Curriculum is $800 per year. (Paid in quarterly installments of $200.) NOTE that this applies to ONE project per member. If you elect to participate in more than one musical, you will need to pay a higher fee. (It won’t necessarily be double for two projects - we will have to assess the number of people doing multiple projects and figure out the impact on our over-all budget before deciding the exact fee.)


GENERAL MEMBERSHIP
In the second year (and beyond) of membership at NMI, a writer is considered to be a GENERAL MEMBER. General Members have two main opportunities: the Monday Night Reading; and One-on-One Dramaturgy sessions.

MONDAY NIGHT READING: General Members have the chance to sign up for a MONDAY NIGHT READING slot for whatever new musical you are working on. Some of the MONDAY NIGHT READING slots come with 3 rehearsals; some come with 2; some come with 1; and some are just cold readings. These rehearsals will also take place on Monday evenings, and we will provide you with sight-singers for your readings from the Academy Repertory Company (ARC) and guests. You will be required to provide a cast list at least one month prior to your first scheduled rehearsal; and to provide copies for your cast, director, and musical director. You can invite whatever guests you would like to your presentation; and we will also live-stream and record your presentation.

ONE-ON-ONE-DRAMATURGY: General Members have the chance to sign up for one 90 minute dramaturgical session per month with a member of the NMI staff. These meetings can be set up on your own schedule; and for whatever project you are working on. They can take place in person or via video conference.

The fee for General Membership is $500 per year. (Paid in quarterly installments of $125.)

Non-Member Collaborators. In General Membership projects, Members may collaborate with non-members. Non-members must pay a $200 annual fee to compensate NMI for the feedback they receive at our sessions. Members are strongly encouraged to ask their non-member collaborators to join NMI at the appropriate level. Non-members may audit General Workshop, but may not participate in discussion (even of their team’s project).


VOLUNTEER HOURS
All active Members of NMI (General and Fringe) are expected to contribute a minimum of four volunteer hours each semester. (To NMI, First Semester is September 1 through January 15. Second Semester is January 16 through June 25.)

We will make every effort to create volunteer projects that match your schedule, interest, and skills. Each semester, a list of volunteer projects will be offered on the website. To sign up for a volunteer task, go to the Member Homepage and find the “Your Volunteer Status” section. If you don’t find a task there that matches your schedule or interest, speak up! and help us create another project which is more appealing to you. The last thing we want to do is make you unhappy with a bunch of work that is odious to you.

Hours may not be carried over from one semester to the next. That is, if you’ve put in 6 volunteer hours in the first semester of the year, you can’t carry over 2 hours to the second semester. The “clock” is re-set each semester. Attendance in workshop or in committee meetings does not count toward volunteer hours.

Failure to meet these minimum expectations will cause you to be considered “not in good standing,” which will automatically disqualify you for participation in readings, productions, festivals and showcases. If you are not in good standing, we will revoke your rights to all other NMI privileges, such as access to the website, access to the ARCtors, NMI events, online newsletter, free theatre tickets, NMI passes to industry workshops (such as ASCAP/Disney), etc. You may restore your status to “member in good standing” the following semester by paying all expected dues and completing all required volunteer hours.

Buying Out Your Hours. If you prefer to contribute money instead of hours, you may contribute $50 for each hour you would like NMI to consider as “approved.” For example, you may contribute $200 to NMI instead of volunteering four hours that semester. You may contribute $400 and buy out your volunteer hours for the whole year. This hourly rate may seem extraordinarily high, and it is. We really want your help, not your money; we’re hoping you’ll prefer to help us, rather than pay us. In doing so, NMI wishes to foster a collaborative spirit which encourages participation, cooperation and a feeling of ownership.


INACTIVE MEMBERSHIP
Members may elect temporary Inactive Status by paying a fee of $100 per year ($25 per quarter). This is a great way to remain on the NMI Roster, and to support the organization, even if you do not currently have any active projects. Inactive members must reapply annually to retain Inactive Status. Inactive members may attend workshop sessions but may not present material, and may not receive feedback of any kind. Inactive members may not collaborate with active members for the $200 fee (and thus be treated as non-members). Inactive Members receive member discounts and the weekly e-newsletter, but no additional benefits of membership (such as discounted rehearsal room rental).


THE SANDBOX
The Sandbox is an opportunity offered to all writers - not just members of NMI. It is designed as an individualized workshop for a specific writing team with a specific project. NMI General Members may choose to take advantage of the Sandbox if they find they are not able to commit to the specific schedule of the Full Length Curriculum or General Workshop.

Sandbox participants are not in a setting with other projects; Sandbox projects have sole focus in their time with staff members.

In your twelve months of membership in the Sandbox, you’ll have nine 2-hour work sessions with your selected staff member to work on such topics as outlining, song-spotting, presentation of scenes and songs, marketing advice, budgeting, feedback, music preparation, song structure, consultation about demo recordings, etc. - depending on the needs of you and your musical at any given moment in the process. Design your own schedule …choose two from column A, three from column B, etc. — whatever’s best for you and your musical…at your pace. Use your nine sessions however you like. Online or in-person.

The fee for the Sandbox is $1500 per project, which can be paid in three installments of $500.

THE MECHANICS HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: GETTING TO KNOW US ASSIGNMENT

New Musicals Inc. (including our curriculum branch - ANMT) is a bustling place, with a lot going on - and a lot to remember. Below you find some nuts-and-bolts information about how to navigate various elements of our website.

HOW TO LOG ON TO THE WEBSITE:

1. Go to www.nmi.org
2. Click the “LOGIN” menu item on the far right of the top menu.
3. Enter your Username and Password in the login form on the right-hand side of the login page, and click the login button.
NOTE: If you have not logged onto the site before, your username will likely be your last name followed by your first name (i.e., Jane Smith would have the username SmithJane). Your temporary password is likely to be “nmi”. If this login information doesn’t work for you, try clicking the LOST YOUR PASSWORD link on the login page and requesting a password reset. If you are still not able to get into the site, please email us at admin@nmi.org right away and we will help you out.
4. After successfully logging in, you will find yourself on the NMI Member Account Home Page. PLEASE CHECK OUT YOUR NMI ACCOUNT HOME PAGE – there is LOTS of GREAT INFORMATION there, and links to such things as the Member Roster, general Member Documents, Member Payment Info (you won’t have a payment record yet - nobody in Core will get charged until after membership decisions are made in October); and the Weekly Email and Member News items.

Once you have found your NMI Member Account Home Page - there are THREE PAGES you will want to check out right away:

1. Under the heading PERSONAL PROFILE, click the button that reads UPDATE YOUR PROFILE INFO. From here you can click UPDATE YOUR LOGIN/CONTACT INFO to update your name, email address and contact info; as well as update a picture and other information about yourself, including your pronouns.

2. Under the heading CORE CURRICULUM AUDITION APPLICATION, you will see a reference to your application, and a link to VIEW/EDIT SUBMISSION. Click that, and when you get to your application page, take a look at the toggles to the right-hand side of the page and open those up and have a look at the info. The toggles will tell you a lot of useful info about the audition process including: what to expect for the September and October sessions; info on the Craft Labs that are part of the program; a schedule of dates for the whole season; a listing of SCRIPTS you will want to read prior to each session (with links to the PDF documents) – including the script that you will want to have read prior to the September sessions so you will be ready for the first assignment; instructions for video conferencing; info and a link to a sample of the type of piano/vocal score we require from composer participants; and info on the fees for the season (which don’t kick in until AFTER the auditions).

2. Under YOUR PROJECT PAGES, click on the link to the Core Curriculum Home Page where you will find lots more info – in particular about the other participants who will be joining you for the audition process (HINT: Check out the “BIOS/INFO” tab to see pictures, bios, and other info about your fellow auditioners). Make sure to check out all the tabs, toggles, and links of this page - as it will be your home base for the rest of the season if you wind up staying with us after October.

NOTE: For some useful video tutorials on how to login, as well as how to update your contact info and input your picture and bio, check out the VIDEO TUTORIALS at http://nmi.org/website-tutorial-videos/

SYLLABUS – MUSIC LAB HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: THE CRAFT LABS ASSIGNMENT

MUSIC LAB SYLLABUS


To complete the Music Lab for the purposes of the ANMT Core Curriculum, please do the following:

       - View all the videos.
       - Read all the handouts.
       - Take all the tests.
       - Read all the exercises; though executing them is voluntary.
       - Complete and SUBMIT all of the required Music Lab assignments (outlined below).

You will receive feedback on your submitted assignments from the Music Lab Evaluator.

NOVEMBER 1 DEADLINE:

Unit One - The Musical Score
Assignment #1: Student Introduction
Assignment #2: Sample Score NOTE: The video for this unit will say that you are required to acquire THREE scores; but for the purposes of the ANMT Core Curriculum, you are only required to obtain ONE score.

Unit Two – The Female Voice
Assignment #1: Vocal Chart – Female.
Assignment #2: Color and Range – Female. This assignment is OPTIONAL for Core composers.

Unit Three – The Male Voice
Assignment #1: Vocal Chart – Male.
Assignment #2: Color and Range – Male. This assignment is OPTIONAL for Core composers.

DECEMBER 1 DEADLINE:

Unit Four – Setting a Lyric
Please note: The workload for this Unit is substantial; plan your schedule accordingly.
Assignment #1: Working with Meter in Lyrics.
Assignment #2: Metrical Analysis in Lyrics.
Assignment #3: Setting Lyrics – A Sections.
Assignment #4: Setting Lyrics – Subsequent Sections

JANUARY 1 DEADLINE:

Unit Five – Creating a Piano Arrangement
Assignment #1: Structure & Substitutions (Harmonization).
Assignment #2: Structure & Substitutions (Advanced).

FEBRUARY 1 DEADLINE:

Unit Six – Formatting a Song
Assignment #1: Formatting a Solo.
Assignment #2: Formatting an Ensemble.

Unit Seven – Composing Incidental Music
Assignment #1: Underscoring a Dramatic Scene (from A Doll’s House.) This assignment is OPTIONAL for Core composers.
Assignment #2: Underscoring a Comedic Scene (from The Importance of Being Earnest).

MARCH 1 DEADLINE:

Unit Eight - Formatting a Score
Assignment #1: Formatting a Solo Number in an Integrated Script/Score.
Assignment #2: Formatting an Ensemble Number in an Integrated Script/Score. This assignment is OPTIONAL for Core composers.

Unit Nine – Integrated Script/Score
Assignment #1: The Opening of Your Show

NOTE: March 15th is the absolute last date you can turn in assignments; the Music Lab must be completed no later than March 15th in order for you to be considered as a composer for the 15 Minute Musicals.

SYLLABUS – LYRIC LAB HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: THE CRAFT LABS ASSIGNMENT

Lyric Lab Syllabus


The Lyric Lab is made up of seven units. Please follow the order of the units as listed on this syllabus as many of the topics build upon previous material. Most units have a video, a handout, a test, and an assignment. Some units have multiples of some of these, and some units have optional exercises.

    Unit #0: Overview
    Unit #1: Progressions
    Unit #2: Prosody & Scansion
    Unit #3: Scansion Subtleties
    Unit #4: Rhyme
    Unit #5: Formatting
    Unit #6: Song Spotting

November 1 deadline:   OVERVIEW & PROGRESSIONS

In the Overview Unit, you will be introduced to some of the goals of the Lyric Lab. There is also a short video about writing in a structure, and an introduction to the AABA song structure.

Handouts: Syllabus, Song Structure I, Song Structure 2 - Which Structure to Choose?, AABA Structure
Videos: Overview, Song Structure in Musical Theatre, AABA Structure
Tests: Overview of Structure Test, AABA Structure Test
Assignments: Overview Assignment, Song Structure Assignment

The Progressions Unit introduces the concept of progression in refrains. Specific progressions discussed are:
Problem/Solution
Viewpoint
Time Progression - Past/Present/Future
Time Progression - The Calendar or the Clock
Pronoun Progression
Geography Progression


Included is an extended session of optional examples, comparing structures in classic musicals to contemporary musicals.

Handouts: Progression, Progression Examples
Videos: Progressions, Progression Examples
Exercises: Progression Exercises
Tests: Progression Test
Assignment: Progression Assignment


December 1 deadline:   PROSODY & SCANSION

This unit introduces you to the study of prosody, and the fundamentals of poetic scansion. Topics in this unit include:
Bad Prosody
Poetic Meter (v. Spoken Meter and Musical Meter)
Repairing Prosody
Vocabulary of Scansion
The Reason for Scansion
Scansion Techniques


Handouts: Prosody, Scansion
Videos: Prosody, Scansion, Terms You’ll Never Need to Know, Scansion Exercises
Exercises: Scansion Exercises
Tests: Prosody Test, Scansion Test
Assignments: Prosody Assignments 1, 2, and 3 (Prosody Assignment #4 is Optional); Scansion Assignment


January 1 deadline:   SCANSION SUBTLETIES & RHYME

The Scansion Subtleties Unit covers some finer points of Scansion, including some problematic situations, with a look ahead at substitution and irregular meter. The video demonstrates scansion of some of the verses you will be scanning, and an explanation of some anomalies and how you might think about them.

Handouts: Scansion Subtleties
Videos: Scansion Subtleties
Tests: Scansion Subtleties Test
Assignment: Scansion Subtleties Assignment

The Rhyme Unit covers rhyme in musical theatre. Topics included in this unit include:
Single Rhyme
Double Rhyme
Triple Rhyme
Near Rhymes
Rhyme in Pop songs v. Musical Theatre songs
The Importance of Rhyme in Musical Theatre


Handouts: Rhyme, Marking Rhyme Schemes
Videos: Rhyme, Marking Rhyme Schemes, The Importance of Rhyme; Rhyme Exercises
Exercises: Rhyme Exercises
Tests: Rhyme Test 1, Rhyme Test 2
Assignments: Rhyme Assignment, Refrain Structure Review Assignment


February 1 deadline:   FORMATTING

Preparing a manuscript for rehearsal/workshop, and the differences in the manuscripts sent to producers and theatres.

Formatting script and score for producers
The integrated script and score for rehearsals
Mechanics of preparing an integrated script and score


Handouts: Format Guidelines
Videos: Formatting Script and Score, Formatting Guidelines Annotations
Exercises: Formatting Exercises
Assignment: Formatting Assignment


March 1 deadline:   SONG SPOTTING

This unit discusses the purpose of songs in musical theatre:
Exposition
Conflict
Action
Character Changes


One of the videos in this unit is dedicated solely to a discussion about songs whose purpose is some aspect of character:
Self-discovery
Decision-making
Resolve Conflict
Enflame Conflict


The unit includes with a brief discussion about songs which are not driven by story, and concludes with a wild song-spotting session with Scott.

Handouts: Song Spotting, Character Change, Spotting Checklist, Spotting Session
Videos: Song Spotting, Character Change, Songs Not Driven by Story, Spotting Checklist, A Spotting Session with Scott
Exercises: Spotting Exercises
Assignment” Spotting Assignment: In the final assignment, you are asked to spot songs possibilities for a play which doesn’t yet have songs.

NOTE: March 15th is the absolute last date you can turn in assignments; the Lyric Lab must be completed no later than March 15th in order for you to be considered as a lyricist for the 15 Minute Musicals.

SYLLABUS – BOOK LAB HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: THE CRAFT LABS ASSIGNMENT

Book Lab Syllabus


The Book Lab is designed as an introduction to writing the book of a musical while also outlining the collaborative steps involved in creating a new musical with the whole team. The book of a musical is not just the spoken words, but encompasses the entire story of the musical. The Bookwriter is officially responsible for the writing of the book, but the entire writing team needs to collaborate on the story. The collaborative process is explored through six units.

November 1 deadline:
Unit 1: THE IDEA

Assignment #1: Action Loops
Assignment #2: Conflict/Adaptation

December 1 deadline:
Unit 2: THE OUTLINE

Assignment #1: Sample Outline
Assignment #2: Character Worksheet

January 1 deadline:
Unit 3: THE ROUGH DRAFT

Assignment #1: Stranger/Neighbor Exposition
Assignment #2: Character Diction

Unit 4: ADDING SONGS
Assignment #1: The New York Song

February 1 deadline:
Unit 5: REVISIONS

Assignment #1: Ten Minute Play

March 1 deadline:
Unit 6: FINISHING TOUCHES

Assignment #1: Pitch

NOTE: March 15th is the absolute last date you can turn in assignments; the Book Lab must be completed no later than March 15th in order for you to be considered as a bookwriter for the 15 Minute Musicals.

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION ASSIGNMENT

NMI CORE Curriculum Scholarship Application



The Student Discount for CORE Curriculum is a scholarship funded through the Helen & Jose Colton Foundation. It’s a need, merit, and discipline-based scholarship that NMI is offering to students currently in college or recently graduated.

Need as in financial need due to student debt, college tuition, or other school related expenses. Merit as in skill, talent, and passion to learn demonstrated in the October sessions. Discipline as in what you “do” for Core. This may affect how many composers, writers, and lyricists get a scholarship.

Please fill out the below information to apply for this scholarship.



Name:

Email:


Recent College and Major (specify undergrad/graduate):

Year Graduated:

Discipline(s) (Bookwriter, Lyricist, Composer):

Current Employer:

Price Breakdown:
In CORE we ask you to pay quarterly or monthly payments for taking our classes which include your discipline lab(s). CORE Curriculum participants generally pay in four installments of $375 (paid October 15, November 15, January 15, and March 15). This includes all monthly collaborative assignments, ONE Craft Lab (Book, Music, or Lyrics) and the production of a 15 Minute Musical at the end of the season.

For the Student Discount, we are offering the option to pay SIX installments
         (Oct/Nov/Dec/Jan/Feb/Mar)

If the full amount were paid over six installments, it would be $250 per month.

Our question to you would be: How close to $250 per month would you be able to afford?

$___________

PLEASE ALSO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:

Why do you want to learn to write musical theatre?



Why do you like collaboration? What about it? ?



Do you see Musical Theatre Writing as a potential career path moving forward? ?



What are some of your goals for this workshop? ?



What are some financial strains on your life right now? ?



Why would this scholarship benefit you in taking this class? ?



Please email this form AND your artist resume to outreach@nmi.org
With the subject line “Scholarship Application” by September 30th to be considered.

Decisions will be made after the CORE Curriculum October Presentations, and Scholarship recipients will be notified within TWO DAYS of the October Sunday session.

Thank you for your information and time!


SONG SPOTTING WORKSHEET – EXAMPLE HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: ADAPTATION – PART 2 ASSIGNMENT

SONG SPOTTING WORKSHEET - EXAMPLE

Working Title(s) of the Song:
Believe in the Small; The Small and Mighty; Believe in Me; Deep Down Inside; Look at Me

Scene Number: Act Two, Scene Four

Character(s) singing the song: Chicken Little

Page number: 2-4-10

1-3 sentence narrative version of the lyric:
Chicken Little complains that no one pays any attention to him because he’s so small. He knows he can help people, if they’d just give him a chance. He contemplates going home and giving up, but pulls himself up by his bootstraps and vows to carry out his rescue plan anyway.

First line of dialogue which this song replaces: I could’ve helped, I really really could’ve.

Last line of dialogue which this song replaces: I pick…rescue!

Purpose: Character (decision)

Suggested Structure: AABA

Suggested Progression: Problem/Solution

Description of the purpose of each stanza (i.e., each A, each B or C)
First A: Problem: No one believes in me because I’m so small.
Second A: Elaboration: Even though I have a plan, no one’ll give me a chance.
B-section: Contemplated Solution: I could give up and go home.
Final A: Action: Chicken Little to the rescue! (climbs castle wall)

Do you think some dialogue will be included during this song? No.



SONG SPOTTING WORKSHEET HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: ADAPTATION – PART 2 ASSIGNMENT

SONG SPOTTING WORKSHEET

Preparation


Before filling out your Song Spotting Worksheets, please consider the following:

The purpose of a song in a musical:
Reveal a truth
Keep the story going throughout the song, to the very last bar.
Point the story forward
Coincide with the emotional climax, the story climax, and the musical climax of a scene

Something must change during a song:
1. Exposition - Someone knows something more than at the song’s beginning.
2. Action - characters do things, to change things.
3. Conflict - could be heightened or resolved.
4. Character - is changed through the arc of a song.

Possibilities for Character Change During a Song:
Joining forces
Self-discovery
Resolve a confrontation/conflict
Enflame a confrontation/conflict
Decision-making

A Checklist To Aid in Spotting A Song
1. Which character has the highest emotional stakes in the scene? Generally that’s the character who’ll be the most likely candidate for a song.
2. What is the main action of the scene? Can you encompass that action in a song structure like AABA or ABAC?
3. Where does a character take action, or make a decision? Can that be a song?
4. Where’s the strongest conflict in the scene? What if that became a song?
5. What is the topic of the song? Songs should be about one thing.
6. Find a moment in which you can push your character to the point beyond which he cannot speak; if there isn’t one in the scene yet, re-examine the need for the scene. You might need to increase the stakes, or make his force of opposition stronger in order to drive him beyond the point of speech.
7. Does your song create a strong sense of “What’s going to happen next?” at its conclusion? (If not, go back to the drawing board.)
8. Can music alone tell the story (that is, must you have lyrics or dialogue)?



SAMPLE OUTLINE FORMAT HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: ADAPTATION – PART 1 ASSIGNMENT

SAMPLE OUTLINE FORMAT

TITLE: THE TITLE OF YOUR SHOW

COLLABORATORS:

Book by Joe Bookwriter
Music by Jill Composer
Lyrics by Nancy Lyricist

CHARACTERS:
Lead Character’s Name – (Actor playing role, if applicable)
Another Character’s Name – (Actor playing role, if applicable)
Another Character’s Name – (Actor playing role, if applicable)
Etc.

Who is your main character? – Name of your main character
What does he want? – A short description of your lead character’s main goal or want.
What stops him from getting it? – a short description of the obstacles and/or conflicts preventing your lead character from achieving his goal and/or want.

OUTLINE

The first paragraph of your outline will detail how your story begins, establish your lead character, and explain the lead character’s main goal. Remember that your outline should be a present tense telling of the action of the story. Stick to what the audience can see and hear, not what you are hoping they will imagine or infer.

The second paragraph of your outline will explain the steps your lead character takes to accomplish his/her goal, and the obstacles (or conflict or force of opposition) that prevents him/her from being successful. Remember that these events should be connected by cause and effect, and the tension/conflict should be increasing throughout the story.

The last paragraph of your outline will tell how your lead character eventually accomplishes or does not accomplish his/her goal. This could also be a place to state your main theme, and/or to encapsulate the emotional arc of your lead character (i.e., how is your lead character different NOW from what he/she was at the beginning of the story?).


INSTRUCTIONS FOR CREATING AN OUTLINE HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: ADAPTATION – PART 1 ASSIGNMENT

INSTRUCTIONS FOR CREATING AN OUTLINE

Your outline should be a prose description of the action of your musical, told in present tense, which spells out the beginning, middle and end of a story.
Your initial outline, for the purposes of Core Curriculum assignments, should be no more than one page, single spaced. Half page is fine. You’ll probably want to have one paragraph for the beginning, one paragraph for the middle, and one paragraph for the end.

Include a working title and the names of all the authors on your collaborative team.

Begin your submission with the following questions and their answers:

Who is your main character?
What does he want?
What stops him from getting it?


alternately, you may include the following questions and their answers:

Who is your main character?
What does he learn?
What causes him to learn it?



Examples of Questions and Answers

Who is your main character? Lazlo.
What does he want? To steal the Mona Lisa.
What stops him from getting it? A guard.

Who is your main character? Tyrannosaurus Rex.
What does he want? The female Tyrannosaurus.
What stops him from getting it? The female Tyrannosaurus thinks he’s too weak; so he has to prove he’s a carnivore (which makes him sick to his stomach). He must eat the saber tooth tiger or lose the female Tyrannosaurus forever. The saber tooth has other ideas.


Tips

Create specific needs and wants, which are accomplishable in this room/on stage before our eyes. Do not write generalities which your main character can’t act upon.

Here are some vague examples (not accomplishable IN THIS ROOM)
He wants to be happy.
He wants to be rich.
He wants to be loved.
He wants to be a hero.


Here are better examples (accomplishable IN THIS ROOM)
He wants the girl to kiss him.
He wants to break into the vault and steal the jewels.
He wants his fiance to say yes to his proposal.
He wants to bite the saber tooth tiger in the leg.



Once Your Outline is Ready

1. Upload your outline to the Core Curriculum Home Page under your Team for this assignment.

and also

2. Email admin@nmi.org and your collaborators to let them know that you have uploaded the outline.


IN SUPPORT OF ADAPTATION HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: ADAPTATION – PART 1 ASSIGNMENT

IN SUPPORT OF ADAPATION

Advice to Young Musical Writers


In recent years there has been an ever-increasing number of adaptations in the theater and, by consequence, a steady decline of original works. This has been especially true of the musical play (musical play as opposed to musical comedy). There have actually been only three successful original musical plays in the last decade. This dearth has frequently been mentioned in the press, and when it has been, it has always been accompanied by a mournful cry for more fresh creation. As one who has written four originals, the one between these covers included, let me hereby warn all aspiring authors and composers to stuff their ears with cotton and pay no heed to this soulful wail. No one, neither critic nor public, is clamoring for originality. The only desire is for something good. And to be good is quite original enough. If you create a total work that finds general acceptance, no mention will be made of what you have done. If it’s unsuccessful, no one will commend you for your effort and encourage you to continue. All this I can state as a positive fact. And though it may seem edged with bitterness, I can assure you it is not. I have always been fully aware of the folly of that end of my endeavor and have often cursed the ambition that drives me. But with it all, my rewards in the musical field have been far in excess of what I truthfully feel I have contributed. No, my reasons for the above advice are sound and practical and come from one who loves his trade and has deep respect for it as a medium of expression.

The lyric theater is the one, and only one, true invention that has been made in theatrical form for many years. It is also a purely American creation; so American, in fact, is this subtle interweaving of word, song, and dance, that no other country has even been able to approach it. Because it is new, it also has great possibilities for development. And with a public that is searching for escape almost more avidly than it did during the war, there is a large, waiting audience. But there is also a problem. And this problem is a serious one. The spank in the machine is that there are very few people writing musicals. I don’t believe there are more than a dozen composers, librettists, and lyricists in all who are regular practitioners and who have committed their careers to the musical stage. Not only that, but of that number no more than three, possibly four, have been developed in the past ten years. The rest have been the backbone of our musical theater since the twenties and early thirties.

There are a myriad of reasons why this should be so. The most important one, however, is economic. Although there are many struggling neophytes composing musical plays, the cost of production these days is so astronomical that investors are reluctant to trust their funds to any but the tried and true. The hazard is further increased by the fact that the cost of attending a musical has risen so that although there is a public longing for entertainment, people are unwilling to risk the price of a ticket unless they have been assured by the press that the evening will be a rewarding one. This means there is no room for the moderate success. A musical show is either a smash hit or it will invariably be a financial failure. And to increase the hazard even more, favorable notices by a majority of the eight New York critics are not sufficient. There are two of the eight writing for the daily press who must be pleased above all. Survival without their blessing is relatively impossible; even though survival with their blessing is not absolutely guaranteed. All of this naturally has immediate effects on the economic and emotional plight of the author and composer. How long can they continue writing without seeing production of, and receiving remuneration for, their efforts? Where do they make mistakes and thus learn? And how long can anyone endure without some sign of encouragement?

And so I return to my early thesis. With the risks being what they are – and I have only mentioned a few of the multitude – your chances not only of reaching production but achieving success will be inestimably enhanced if you begin with a book, a short story, a motion picture, or a play that has already been approved by public and critic alike. The value of the basic story cannot be exaggerated. There is often a general tendency to regard the book of a musical as of little consequence. This is especially true when the musical is a success. But let the opening night be a two and a half hour wake and you will read the next morning how neither the cast, the music, the scenery, nor the dancing was able to overcome the inept plot. I can tell you the book is all-essential. It is the fountain from which all waters spring. So start off on the right foot and select a story that is all prepared for you. The translation of that story to musical form is quite complex enough. Within that frame you will find more than adequate challenge to your originality and enough on which to experiment.

Alan J. Lerner
In the forward to Paint Your Wagon
January 25, 1952


GENERAL COLLABORATION AGREEMENT HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: COLLABORATION ASSIGNMENT

ACADEMY FOR NEW MUSICAL THEATRE
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT


Collaborative Musical Assignments - Core Curriculum

As a participant in ANMT’s Core Curriculum, I, __________________________
understand and agree to the following policy regarding ownership of any writing that I do as part of the assignments associated with the Core Curriculum and the Labs.

I retain full ownership of any writing that I do for an ANMT assignment, in the craft to which I have been officially assigned by ANMT, regardless of the contribution of my fellow collaborators. That is to say, if I am assigned as a lyricist, I retain rights to the lyrics; if I am assigned as a composer, I retain the rights to the music; if I am assigned as a bookwriter, I retain rights to the book.

I further understand that if I make a contribution to someone else’s craft on an assignment, I do not receive any ownership in that person’s rights. For example, if I am assigned as a composer but assist in the lyrics, I retain full ownership in the music, but no ownership in the lyrics.

A copy of this agreement shall be filed with the Academy for New Musical Theatre.

______________________________________________________________
Signature

__________________________________________
Date

FORMAT GUIDELINES FOR SCRIPT HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: RHYTHM/UPTEMPO ASSIGNMENT

FORMAT GUIDELINES FOR SCRIPT - AN INTRODUCTION

ANMT/NMI has a very detailed document that outlines the Samuel French Broadway format for an integrated script and score. You will want to become familiar with that document - which is available in the GENERAL DOCUMENTS section of the Core Home Page.

In the meantime, for the purposes of this RHYTHM/UPTEMPO scene assignment for bookwriters, please follow the basic format guidelines below.

BOOK
1” margins top, bottom, right, left
Courier (12 point)
Cover page indicates title and authors (traditionally bookwriter first, then composer, then lyricist)
Second page with cast, time, place
New scene begins new page
Initial stage direction of a scene indented 3”; no parentheses on initial stage directions
Subsequent stage directions indented 1” from left and 1” from right
Character names indented 3”
Dialogue flush left
Asides indented 1”, lowercase, in parentheses; asides should not be full sentences. (If they’re full sentences, promote them to full stage directions.)
In stage directions, capitalize character names and pronouns for the party performing an action – not the one having an action performed on them (“GEORGE walks into the room. HE stares at Mrs. Washington.”)
Page numbers - Indicate Act, Scene and page in upper right (2-3-67)
Song title should be the last thing in the script before the lyric page, in a stage direction, bolded. Precede the bolded title with some kind of not-bolded stage direction, even if you have to invent something innocuous like “HE smiles” or “THEY preen.”
no need for copyright notices
final collated script and score copies should be double-sided.

LYRICS
Lyrics in ALL CAPS, indented .5”
B-sections of lyrics indented 1.0”
C-sections of lyrics indented 1.5”
Subsequent sections, continue to increase indent by .5”
Introductory sections indented so they won’t be mistaken for A sections — probably 1.5” or more, depending upon aesthetics.
If a line of lyrics is too wide for margin, apply a .5” hanging indent, so that when it wraps, the remainder of that line is additionally indented.

DEFINITIONS OF SONG TYPES HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: COLLABORATION ASSIGNMENT



THE BALLAD


A ballad is a song with a serious lyrical intention that is characterized by the legato feeling of the melodic line. That is, the content of the song is usually something we take seriously and the music is smooth and flowing. It is the legato feeling of the music that really defines the song. In other words, a bouncy tune with serious words isn’t a ballad, whereas a smooth, flowing melody with a lighter content very well could be a ballad.

Ballads are used for many dramatic reasons, but the most common is probably a love song of some kind or other. Examples abound, and you can select your favorites. “If Ever I Would Leave You” is a typical ballad of the love song variety. Although the song is performed in the show Camelot with a very strong rhythmic pulse, the melody is very legato in style. Notice, also, how the words are arranged to make this possible. The only consonant that could be considered harsh in the opening title phrase is the “v” in ever and leave, and neither sound prevents the easy motion of the lyric. Say the phrase, “If ever I would leave you.” One word blends into the next effortlessly – making this very easy to sing in the legato style of the music. Also, the phrases tend to end with round, open sounds – “Knowing how in spring I’m bewitched by you soooooooo” – so the singer can sustain the ends of phrases with an attractive sound. If a ballad is defined by the character of the music, the definition must be supported by the sound and content of the words.

Certainly not all ballads are boy-meets-girl love songs. One of the most interesting is from Oklahoma! The song “Lonely Room” is used to humanize a character. Jud is the villain, but rather than the evil, leering gent of earlier melodramas, he’s characterized as a psychologically disturbed murderer who craves physical love. Here the song really helps the audience understand and even fear the character. The words are effective, and the music is sometimes balladic and legato, other times abrupt and staccato, reflecting the schizoid nature of both the song’s content and the character.

Another interesting use of a ballad is the song “Far From The Home I Love” in Fiddler On The Roof. This song explores the drama with a simple eloquence and causes the central character to re-examine his priorities when his daughter sings it. Again, the lyrics support the style of the music with soft consonants – “Far from the home I love/Yet there with my love, I’m home.”

Examples of Ballads

Classic:
“If Ever I Would Leave You” (Camelot)
“Lonely Room” (Oklahoma)
“Far From the Home I Love” (Fiddler on the Roof)
“Send in the Clowns” (A Little Night Music)

Contemporary:
“Home” (Bat Boy)
“Fine Fine Line” (Avenue Q)
“I Am Here for You” (Book of Mormon)



THE RHYTHM/UPTEMPO


Note: We used to call this kind of song a “charm” song; many composers still do. We have found, however, that the commodity “charm” has gone out of fashion in musical theatre, and songs which used to be considered charming are now rather old-fashioned and approach parody. The artistic elements of a rhythm/uptempo remain the same, however.

Rhythm/Uptempo songs are defined by the rhythm – not merely the rhythm in the accompaniment, but also and especially the rhythmic syncopation of the melodic line.

The lyrics to a rhythm/uptempo song are usually optimistic and not as serious or ambitious as those of a ballad, and the words will contain lots of good, hard consonants and rhythmic phrases that lend themselves to syncopation.

The quintessential rhythm/uptempo song must surely be “The Surrey With The Fringe On Top” from Oklahoma!. The lyric is narrative and percussive, the tune is rhythmic and reflects the content of the words, and the effect in the theatre is uptempo beyond belief.

Rhythm/uptempo songs are not hard to find. They are the mainstay of a score, outnumbering ballads and comedy songs by at least two to one. Consider just a couple and examine how the words and music work together to create the rhythmic unity that produces such a high degree of charm in the theatre.

Examples of Uptempo Songs

Classic:
“The Surrey With the Fringe on Top” (Oklahoma!)
“Getting to Know You” (The King and I)
“I Feel Pretty” (West Side Story)
“She Loves Me” (She Loves Me)
“Wouldn’t it Be Loverly?” (My Fair Lady)

Contemporary:
“If You Were Gay” (Avenue Q)
“My Major is Joan” (Fun Home)
“Man Up” (Book of Mormon)



THE COMEDY SONG


A comedy song is defined as a song in which the lyrics make us laugh out loud more than once. Comedy songs are generally complaints, and very often indulge in self-pity. Self-pity is only attractive when it makes us laugh.

Ballads and uptempo songs are characterized by the style of the music, but in comedy songs the words take precedence. Frequently the music to a comedy song is very attractive and charming, but the audience seldom cares as long as it supports the lyrics, which make us laugh out loud.

Topics for comedy songs are usually in the nature of a complaint of some kind, may be dripping with self-pity and always are rooted in some sort of problem. In “I’m Just A Girl Who Cain’t Say No,” Ado Annie thinks she has a terrible disease. She believes that the other girls don’t have the feelings she experiences when she’s with a “feller.” “Adelaide’s Lament” in Guys And Dolls is that her perpetual cold is probably psychosomatically induced by her unwed status. In Brigadoon, a young girl’s search for “The Love Of My Life” thinly disguises her questionable virtue. Tevye’s “If I Were A Rich Man” from Fiddler on the Roof is mainly about his misconceptions of wealth. In each case there is an element of complaint – and something real to complain about: poverty, lack of virtue, chronic sniffles or the painful realities of puberty. Normally a complaint is not attractive and writers eschew self-pity like the plague – and they ought to! Except when writing comedy songs.

Comedy songs are much harder to write than they are to define. However, there’s at least one in every successful score, and two or three are to be hoped for. Audiences love to laugh. When attending a musical, the audience’s expectation is that a fair amount of entertainment will ensue. Originally, remember, the form was called “musical comedy”, and the responsibility to help an audience laugh remains strongly a part of the genre.

Examples of Comedy Songs

Classic:
“I’m Just A Girl Who Cain’t Say No” (Oklahoma)
“Adelaide’s Lament” (Guys and Dolls)
“The Love Of My Life” (Brigadoon)
“If I Were A Rich Man” (Fiddler on the Roof)

Contemporary:
“The Internet is for Porn” (Avenue Q)
“Sex is in the Heel” (Kinky Boots)
“You and Me (But Mostly Me)” (Book of Mormon)



THE MUSICAL SCENE


A musical scene is defined as a moment in a musical when an entire scene is musicalized. This may mean that the sequence contains one or more songs and/or reprises, including underscored dialogue (if necessary, but not required). The section being musicalized must be a complete scene, with a beginning, middle, and end, and including a dramatic action.

Definitions of dramatic action will keep you awake nights, but the one we use is: The exercise of a character’s will in the face of an opposing force.

Musical scenes are useful when there are multiple conflicting forces on stage at the same time (Think “Tonight” from West Side Story), but they’re not merely crowd scenes. The focus of a musical scene is generally on one character who is working through a problem or confronting a conflict, though there could be multiple characters in action.

Ballads, rhythm/uptempo songs and comedy songs can all serve as the basis for musical scenes. “Tonight” from West Side Story is an example of a musical scene arising from a ballad.

Another example of a musical scene (even though it only involves one character) is “Soliloquy” from Carousel. It begins as a reflective moment and contains elements of charm in the songs “My Boy Bill” and “My Little Girl”. But at the end of the song, the young father-to-be realizes what his responsibilities will be. Consider the final lyrics: “I never knew how to make money/But I’ll try, by God, I’ll try/I’ll go out and make it or steal it or take it/Or die!” The reflection has caused him to make a decision, and we know he will act on it. Definitely a musical scene.

Not all musical scenes need to have such dire consequences as “Soliloquy” does to qualify. “You Must Meet My Wife” from A Little Night Music is a comedic musical scene. During the song, Frederick gives Desiree permission to hate his wife, Anne, by revealing her to be a perfectly horrible little simp, which she is, and Desiree announces her decision, albeit cleverly and comedically, to do the little witch in.

A caution: don’t create a musical scene simply by adding underscoring or vamps to a scene in a book. You want your music to have a dramatic function, and not simply mark time in order to make a scene feel as though it’s a whole musical sequence.

Examples of Musical Scenes

Classic:
“Tonight” (West Side Story)
“Tevye’s Dream” (Fiddler on the Roof)
“You Must Meet My Wife” (A Little Night Music)
“I’m Going Back” (Bells Are Ringing)
“A Weekend in the Country” (A Little Night Music)

Contemporary:
“The Money Song” (Avenue Q)
“That Horrible Woman” (A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder)
“Gay or European” (Legally Blonde)
“Schuler Defeated” (Hamilton)

CORE CURRICULUM OVERVIEW HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: GETTING TO KNOW US ASSIGNMENT

CORE CURRICULUM WORKSHOP
The Core Curriculum is the heart of the Writers’ Workshop at the Academy for New Musical Theatre (which is the academic branch of New Musicals Inc.), and the entry point for all bookwriters, lyricists, and composers new to ANMT. Meetings take place one weekend per month, generally from September until April. Each month, you will be put on a new team and given a song or scene to write and then present at the next month’s session.

Collaborative Process Overview
During the Core Curriculum season, we will be emphasizing ANMT’s collaborative process. This process is first broken down into four basic parts—blueprinting, drafting, presenting, revising—and then further separated into our 10 Steps of Collaboration.

ANMT’s Recommended 10 Steps of Collaboration:
1) Conception
2) Outlining/re-outlining/greenlight
3) Rough draft
4) Song-spotting
5) Writing music and lyrics/Adjusting book
6) Collaborating on presentation
7) Submitting and presenting first draft for feedback
8) Response to feedback
9) Outlining current draft/outline proposed revisions
10) Revisions

General Session Schedule – one weekend per month
Saturday 2:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Presentations
Sunday 2:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Presentations, Assignments, & Collaborator Meetings

Core Curriculum Schedule for the 2020-21 Season
     Sat, Sep 26
     Sun, Sep 27
     Sat, Oct 17
     Sun, Oct 18
     Sat, Nov 14
     Sun, Nov 15
     Sat, Dec 12
     Sun, Dec 13
     Sat, Jan 9
     Sun, Jan 10
     Sat, Feb 6
     Sun, Feb 7
     Sat, Mar 6
     Sun, Mar 7
     Sat, Mar 27
     Sun, Mar 28
(See 15MM section below for other important dates.)

Reading List
The Core assignments are based on plays, screenplays, and teleplays from the current repertoire (copies of which are available on our website). NOTE that this list is subject to change with notice. Scripts that the participants need to read in order to prepare for the assignments include:

     GLITTER AND BEA by Ryan J. Haddad
     IN THE NEXT ROOM (or the vibrator play) by Sarah Ruhl
     THE BIG SICK by Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani
     THE FERRYMAN by Jez Butterworth
     THE LAST FIRST by Chad Beckim
     THE LITTLE DOG LAUGHED by Douglas Carter Beane
     THE RABBIT HOLE by David Lindsay-Abaire
     WHY WE CAN'T HAVE NICE THINGS by Lloyd Suh


Craft Labs
Each participant in the Core Curriculum is expected to complete one Craft Lab (Book, Lyrics, or Music). These labs focus directly on the discipline most conducive to your particular talents and contain a challenging workload, independent of the Core Curriculum. You are welcome to take more than one Craft Lab if your schedule permits, although we do not recommend taking three in one season since the workload gets pretty heavy.
The Labs are all delivered completely ON LINE with individualized feedback from the evaluators.

Fees
Core Curriculum (including ONE Lab and a 15 Minute Musical): $1700.00
Craft Labs: One Lab is included in Core fee; additional Labs are $495.00 (each)
(Fees are billed in four equal installments billed immediately after the October assignments and then on November 15, January 15, and March 15)

15-Minute Musicals
The Core Curriculum culminates in the intense 15-Minute Musical Experience.
On the 15-Minute Musical Launch Day, you will be put on a team and given a predetermined theme and some common parameters. Just two days later, your team will submit an outline. A week and a half later you will have written your very rough first draft! (Note that your participation will be determined by which Lab(s) you have completed. Lyric Lab participants will be assigned as lyricist, Book Lab as bookwriters, and Music Lab as composers; writers who have completed more than one Lab will be eligible - but not guaranteed - to perform multiple roles depending on the make-up of the group. There will be NO single-writer teams; all teams will have at least two writers, and most will have three.)
Actors will very lightly rehearse this draft and present it for you at the First Assessment where you will receive detailed dramaturgical feedback from the ANMT staff. About two weeks later, you will submit a second draft and go through the same experience at your Second Assessment.
One more re-write and—about two weeks later—your Final Draft will go into rehearsals for a public performance in a Los Angeles theatre - assuming that there are no shelter-in-place orders in effect. (If Los Angeles is under shelter-in-place orders, we will shift the 15 Minute Musicals to a filmed event for the internet.)

15 MINUTE MUSICALS SCHEDULE OVERVIEW (subject to change)

Sat, Apr 3     12:00 pm - 3:00 pm
15 Minute Musicals Launch
All writers are REQUIRED to be in attendance (in person or by live streaming) on this day. Also - clear your schedule late into the evening because you will want to get together with your team and get your outline launched BEFORE you go to bed this night.

From Mon, Apr 5 until the ROUGH DRAFT REVIEW will be your first HEAVY WRITING PERIOD.
You will be outlining, rough drafting, song spotting, song writing, and revising your first draft.
BLOCK OUT THIS 3-WEEK PERIOD FOR HEAVY-DUTY COLLABORATING!!!

Fri, Apr 30     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM - Rough Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS.

Sat, May 1     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM - Rough Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS.

Mon, May 3     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: First Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Tue, May 4     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: First Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Tue, May 4 through Fri, May 7 - Relax! Take the week off while the actors rehearse your First Draft!


Sat, May 8     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM FIRST ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the First Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS


Sun, May 9     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM FIRST ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the First Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS


From Sun, May 9 through the SECOND DRAFT SUBMISSION will be your second HEAVY WRITING PERIOD. You will be revising your draft based on the feedback from the assessment.
BLOCK OUT THIS 2-WEEK PERIOD FOR HEAVY-DUTY COLLABORATING!!!


Wed, May 26     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: Second Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Thu, May 27     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Second Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Thu, May 27 through
Mon, May 31 through
Tue, Jun 1 through
Wed, Jun 2 through Thu, Jun 3 - Relax! Take a break while the actors rehearse your Second Drafts! (You are ENCOURAGED to attend rehearsals, but you are not required to do so.)

Sat, Jun 5     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM SECOND ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the Second Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS


Sun, Jun 6     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM SECOND ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the Second Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS


From Sun, Jun 6 through the ROUGH FINAL DRAFT REVIEW will be your last HEAVY WRITING PERIOD. You will be revising your draft based on the feedback from the assessment.
BLOCK OUT THIS VERY SHORT ONE WEEK PERIOD FOR HEAVY-DUTY COLLABORATING!!!


Wed, Jun 16     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM: Rough Final Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS.


Thu, Jun 17     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Rough Final Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS.


Sat, Jun 19     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: Final Performance Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Sun, Jun 20     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Final Performance Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Sun, Jun 20     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: Director Meetings.
At least one member of your team needs to be available to meet (or Zoom) with your Director to discuss the final draft.


Mon, Jun 21     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Director Meetings.
At least one member of your team needs to be available to meet (or Zoom) with your Director to discuss the final draft.


Mon, Jun 21 through Sat, Jul 10 - Relax! Take three weeks off while your scripts are in final rehearsals. (You are ENCOURAGED to attend rehearsals, but you are not required to do so.) Sat, Jul 10
- Relax! Take three weeks off while your scripts are in final rehearsals. (You are ENCOURAGED to attend rehearsals, but you are not required to do so.)

Mon, Jul 12
Preview at NMI. (Exact time TBA.)

Tue, Jul 13
FIRST PERFORMANCE of all 15 MINUTE MUSICALS. (Exact time and location TBA.)

Wed, Jul 14
SECOND PERFORMANCE of all 15 MINUTE MUSICALS. (Exact time and location TBA.)


Note: Any date shown as REQUIRED ATTENDANCE means in-person for local participants; by LIVE stream-cast for distance participants. Also, each participant would only be assigned to the Red OR the Blue Program, not both.

COLLABORATOR ETIQUETTE HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: COLLABORATION ASSIGNMENT

The most important thing to remember as you enter into a series of “”forced”” collaborations over the next several months is: RESPECT.

If you treat your collaborators with respect, your experience will be far better - even if it is not the perfect collaboration that will turn into a life-long partnership.

DEADLINES: The first thing you will want to do when you begin a new assignment is to make a PLAN with your collaborators about how you will communicate, and what kind of internal deadlines you want to set to make sure the team can meet the assignment deadline(s). RESPECT your team by observing those deadlines.

COMMUNICATION: During the length of your collaboration, make sure you stay in touch with your team. If life intervenes and you can’t make a scheduled meeting/conference call/deadline - make sure you contact your team and let them know what’s up. RESPECT your team by staying communication.

DIVISION OF LABOR: You will be required to sign a Collaborative Agreement before you begin work on your assignments for the Core Curriculum. The purpose of this document is to establish your ownership of any of the work you present in the function to which you have been assigned: bookwriter, lyricist, composer, or some combination.

Please know that we expect you to take the division of these functions extremely seriously. You are certainly encouraged to have as much input as you want into the other areas on your project: if you are bookwriter, you should feel free to offer suggestions for song spotting; if you are a composer, you should feel free to suggest a particular line of dialogue; if you are a lyricist, you should feel free to argue strongly for a melodic or style choice.

But remember this: the ultimate decision belongs to the person who has been designated to the function. The bookwriter has the final word on dialogue. The lyricist has the final word on lyrics. The composer has the final word on the music.

Offer suggestions, request changes, argue your case as strongly as you can. But know that you only have the final word in your own arena.

Also – do not offer suggestions if you are then going to want to be given credit. Just because you suggest a couple of great lyrics does NOT mean you deserve to be credited as a co-lyricist. If you can’t make a suggestion without wanting credit for it, don’t make it.

Even more importantly: never, read NEVER, take it upon yourself to actually make a change outside of your function.

Bookwriters: If you are responsible for incorporating lyrics into your document, make absolutely sure you have accurately reflected the lyricist’s choices. Feel free to make suggestions for alterations, but do not make those alterations yourself and ask for permission later. If you have been asked to supply new dialogue to be spoken during a song, make sure you respond quickly and collaboratively.

Composers: NEVER submit a piece of music to a lyricist in which lyrics have been changed without permission. If you have a suggestion or a request for a change – make the suggestion in person or by email, but do not type it into your score and THEN ask for permission. If you can’t set what you’ve been given – type “la la la” into your score, and ask the lyricist to provide replacement lyrics. Don’t type in alternate lyrics and tell your lyricist they are just “dummy” lyrics and the lyricist can feel free to change them. Don’t do it. It is disrespectful.

Lyricists: NEVER submit a lyric in which you have revised the bookwriter’s words to suit your lyric. You can let your bookwriter know you need a line of dialogue, and possibly type “I need a line here about Joe loving Jane” – but do NOT write the dialogue yourself and then ask your bookwriter if it is okay. Don’t do it. It is disrespectful.

ANMT DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION STATEMENT HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: GETTING TO KNOW US ASSIGNMENT

We Celebrate Your Stories

Musical Theatre is an art form that tells the stories of every race, gender, age, religion, and identity. In order to help tell those stories, we are passionate about creating an inclusive workshop environment that promotes and values diversity. There is more work to be done, and we invite you to be our partners in making sure we do everything we can to celebrate multiple approaches and points of view.

A WARNING FROM YOUR DRAMATURGE HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: ADAPTATION – PART 1 ASSIGNMENT

A WARNING FROM YOUR DRAMATURGE:

This is likely your first experience submitting an outline for my approval. Please be prepared to have to revise your outline several times, based on my notes.

And here’s the warning: I’m really really picky.

I want your outline to be a blue-print for the action of your musical; told in present tense; with no editorializing. (You will have a BIG head start in understanding what I mean by this if you have already completed Unit 2 of the Book Lab - which is a crash-course in outlining).

I will be particularly pushy about the language you use for your outline: you only want to write what your audience will SEE and HEAR. Don’t draw conclusions; don’t set the mood; don’t state backstory; don’t tell me what your character is thinking or feeling, don’t be vague about your setting or the size of your cast; and don’t mention possible songs.

DON’T DRAW CONCLUSIONS
Don’t say “He is angry.”
Say “He throws a chair against the wall.”

In the first example, you are simply stating a fact - but that isn’t useful information for an outline, because you are simply TELLING me what you want me (as an audience member) to think. In the second example, you are SHOWING me an action; and ideally I (as an audience member) will come up with the conclusion that “he is angry” all on my own.
And yes, you could tell me “I’ll figure out what action he does when I actually write the scene” but NO - I don’t accept that. Because the decision about whether he throws a chair, or pouts, or shoots a man dead with his gun will have a HUGE impact on the way the rest of your story unfolds. Your story is about CAUSE and EFFECT - so if you don’t know the exact CAUSE now, how can you figure out what the EFFECT will be?

DON’T SET THE MOOD
This isn’t a novel. An outline is a very dry collection of actions; it isn’t poetry or even prose. It’s simply functional.
Don’t say: “There is an ominous darkness in the air, and it is clear something terrible is about to happen.”
Say: “Bob throws open the door and rushes across the room, where he hides under a table, shaking with fear.”


DON’T STATE BACKSTORY
If there are things about your characters and/or story that you need me to know, don’t simply STATE them as BACKSTORY; make sure you decide WHEN and HOW your audience will learn that information.
Don’t say: “Bob, a champion tennis player, enters the room.”
Say: “Bob enters the room, carrying a tennis racket and brandishing a large trophy.”


DON’T USE DIALOGUE
Careful not to let your outline devolve into dialogue - the temptation is great, but it will lengthen and clutter your outline and make it much harder to see clearly whether or not you have your story beats organized in a compelling way.
Don’t say: “Bob turns to Jane and says ‘I love you.’ She replies ‘I love you, too Bob’.
Say: Bob and Jane confess that they love each other.

(This might seem like only a slight difference - but believe me, once you begin writing dialogue, it is a slippery slope and before you know it you won’t be able to see your plot points for the quotation marks.)

DON’T TELL ME WHAT YOUR CHARACTER IS THINKING OR FEELING
Your audience will only know what they see and hear - so your outline is your chance to decide exactly WHAT to SHOW them to help make sure they will understand what the character is thinking or feeling. But simply stating what they are thinking or feeling will make you think you’ve done your job, when you really haven’t.
Don’t say: “It is clear that Bob really wants to tell Jane how much he loves her.”
Say: “Bob begins to speak, but then changes his mind.”

YES - it will NOT necessarily be clear that he was going to tell Jane how much he loved her - but that is exactly the point. Your audience won’t know what he was going to say - so you will need to determine whether or not the action you have given him is sufficient to get your point across. And remember - your audience doesn’t need to know EVERYTHING right NOW. Will this moment be ENOUGH for them to - eventually - understand what you want them to know about what he’s thinking?

DON’T BE VAUGE ABOUT YOUR SETTING OR THE SIZE OF YOUR CAST
Your outline is the place for you to figure out how big your cast is; and how many locations your set will need to have. Nobody is saying you have to write a three-person single-set show to get produced; but what you DO want to do is to make sure you don’t have more characters or sets than you NEED to tell the story convincingly.
Don’t say: “He stands outside, listening at the door, then walks inside the saloon that is filled with customers. He walks through a door at the other side of the saloon and into the manager’s office.”
Say: “He walks into the manager’s office, and comments on how full the bar is tonight.”

OR
“He walks into the saloon where Fess, Davey, and Scoop are drinking at the bar and Lily is at the piano.”

DON’T MENTION SONGS
Yes, this is a musical. So why shouldn’t you talk about songs?? Because - the outline (and the rough draft) are where you want to get the STORY DETAILS right. Decisions about what aspects of the story will be musicalized should be made later, by the whole team. Even if you are all already really sure that a specific spot will be musicalized, it is still your job as the bookwriter to write the PLOT of that moment - not simply to state that there will be a song.
Don’t say: “He sings a song about his feelings for her.”
Say: “Bob talks about how much he loves Jane; how he has loved her since the first moment he met her, and that today he is sure he is finally going to ask her to marry him.”


TAKE ALL OF THIS VERY SERIOUSLY, PLEASE. You will be writing a lot of outlines - and many more outline revisions - in the CORE program, and in any future dealings with NMI. We take outlines VERY seriously. Put in the work to get it right at this early stage of the game - and resist the urge to say “I’ll fix that when I write the dialogue”. That’s just not how musicals work. There are too many moving parts to a musical to give you the playwright’s luxury of figuring it out as you go along. Figure it out NOW - so your team doesn’t spend their time writing songs that are for the wrong characters at the wrong moments about the wrong topics.

But also remember that you don’t have to get it all right the first time. Do the best you can, and then USE your dramaturge to help you get the rest of the way there. It is my job to point out inconsistencies; or suggest where you might be able to consolidate scenes or characters; or ask questions about your lead character’s arc or the theme of your show. You don’t need to wait until it is PERFECT before you send it to me - but you can certainly minimize the boring feedback about the basics by adhering to my suggestions above; and we can concentrate together on the more interesting part of fine-tuning the heart and soul of your story.

MOST IMPORTANTLY: You will need an outline green light from me before you can begin writing your 15 Minute Musical - so master the form NOW.

Just keep telling yourself: only write down what the audience will SEE and HEAR. You can’t go wrong with that mantra.

15 MINUTE MUSICAL SCHEDULE OVERVIEW HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: ADAPTATION – PART 3 ASSIGNMENT

The 15 Minute Musicals will be upon us before you know it!  There will be LOTS more info coming next month, but in preparation, you should be looking VERY CLOSELY at the schedule overview below.  This overview will tell you when your attendance is REQUIRED (live or streaming live) and when to prepare for the heaviest writing periods with your collaborators to get your three drafts of your musical completed.

***PLEASE TAKE THIS SCHEDULE VERY SERIOUSLY.  You really need to reserve the required days and block out lots of time during the heavy writing periods.  If you don’t think you manage this, you should alert us right away so we can discuss whether or not you will be able to participate in the 15 Minute Musicals. ***


Sat, Apr 3     12:00 pm - 3:00 pm
15 Minute Musicals Launch
All writers are REQUIRED to be in attendance (in person or by live streaming) on this day. Also - clear your schedule late into the evening because you will want to get together with your team and get your outline launched BEFORE you go to bed this night.

From Mon, Apr 5 until the ROUGH DRAFT REVIEW will be your first HEAVY WRITING PERIOD.
You will be outlining, rough drafting, song spotting, song writing, and revising your first draft.
BLOCK OUT THIS 3-WEEK PERIOD FOR HEAVY-DUTY COLLABORATING!!!

Fri, Apr 30     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM - Rough Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS.

Sat, May 1     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM - Rough Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS.

Mon, May 3     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: First Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Tue, May 4     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: First Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Tue, May 4 through Fri, May 7 - Relax! Take the week off while the actors rehearse your First Draft!


Sat, May 8     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM FIRST ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the First Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS


Sun, May 9     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM FIRST ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the First Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS


From Sun, May 9 through the SECOND DRAFT SUBMISSION will be your second HEAVY WRITING PERIOD. You will be revising your draft based on the feedback from the assessment.
BLOCK OUT THIS 2-WEEK PERIOD FOR HEAVY-DUTY COLLABORATING!!!


Wed, May 26     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: Second Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Thu, May 27     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Second Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Thu, May 27 through
Mon, May 31 through
Tue, Jun 1 through
Wed, Jun 2 through Thu, Jun 3 - Relax! Take a break while the actors rehearse your Second Drafts! (You are ENCOURAGED to attend rehearsals, but you are not required to do so.)

Sat, Jun 5     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM SECOND ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the Second Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS


Sun, Jun 6     2:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM SECOND ASSESSMENT: Presentations and Assessments of the Second Drafts.
ATTENDANCE REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS


From Sun, Jun 6 through the ROUGH FINAL DRAFT REVIEW will be your last HEAVY WRITING PERIOD. You will be revising your draft based on the feedback from the assessment.
BLOCK OUT THIS VERY SHORT ONE WEEK PERIOD FOR HEAVY-DUTY COLLABORATING!!!


Wed, Jun 16     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
RED PROGRAM: Rough Final Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL RED PROGRAM WRITERS.


Thu, Jun 17     6:00 pm - 11:00 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Rough Final Draft Due and reviewed.
ATTENDANCE IS REQUIRED FOR ALL BLUE PROGRAM WRITERS.


Sat, Jun 19     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: Final Performance Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Sun, Jun 20     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Final Performance Draft Due.
This is a drop-off deadline only. Someone needs to deliver the copies of your team's draft by the deadline.


Sun, Jun 20     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
RED PROGRAM: Director Meetings.
At least one member of your team needs to be available to meet (or Zoom) with your Director to discuss the final draft.


Mon, Jun 21     6:00 pm - 10:30 pm
BLUE PROGRAM: Director Meetings.
At least one member of your team needs to be available to meet (or Zoom) with your Director to discuss the final draft.


Mon, Jun 21 through Sat, Jul 10 - Relax! Take three weeks off while your scripts are in final rehearsals. (You are ENCOURAGED to attend rehearsals, but you are not required to do so.) Sat, Jul 10
- Relax! Take three weeks off while your scripts are in final rehearsals. (You are ENCOURAGED to attend rehearsals, but you are not required to do so.)

Mon, Jul 12
Preview at NMI. (Exact time TBA.)

Tue, Jul 13
FIRST PERFORMANCE of all 15 MINUTE MUSICALS. (Exact time and location TBA.)

Wed, Jul 14
SECOND PERFORMANCE of all 15 MINUTE MUSICALS. (Exact time and location TBA.)




15 MINUTE MUSICAL COLLABORATION AGREEMENT HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: FORMATTING ASSIGNMENT


************************************************************
THIS IS A SAMPLE OF THE FORM YOU AND YOUR TEAM WILL BE ASKED TO FILL OUT BEFORE STARTING YOUR 15 MINUTE MUSICAL
***********************************************************


ACADEMY FOR NEW MUSICAL THEATRE
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT
15-Minute Musical Project


between ________________________________________________________

and ________________________________________________________

and ________________________________________________________

As of ______________________


The parties agree to collaborate in the writing of a 15 minute musical project as part of the Core Curriculum at the Academy for New Musical Theatre.

At the end of June of this year, ownership of each of the crafts (book, music, lyrics) reverts to the individual writers. That is to say, that a writer who has been assigned the responsibility of “book by” shall retain ownership of the book portion of the musical project, that a writer who has been assigned the responsibility of “music by” shall retain ownership of the music portion of the musical project, and that a writer who has been assigned the responsibility of “lyrics by” shall retain ownership of the lyric portion of the musical project, regardless of the contribution of his fellow collaborators.

This agreement shall be signed by all the writers on this project, and a copy shall be filed with the Academy for New Musical Theatre.


Agreed:

_______________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________



15 MINUTE MUSICAL BIBLE HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: COLLABORATOR PREFERENCE FORM ASSIGNMENT



February 1, 2020

A Heads-Up about the 15 Minute Musicals


Dear Writers:

You are about to embark upon the 15 Minute Musical process. Writing these shows is a very intense but very exciting experience and we hope we can all have a great time conceiving, rehearsing, and performing the wonderful shows you’re about to create.

Here is an overview of the process and schedule you should expect. Look over in particular the dates marked “Required of all collaborators”, because you really need to be at those sessions - either in person in the room or, if absolutely necessary, by streamcasting. But if you live locally, but still feel you must participate via streamcast, you must let your collaborators and us know in advance, and provide us a legitimate financial or medical necessity. We are prepared to be as unforgiving and obstinate as we need to be to get you to join us live, in the room, for these sessions.

Please consider this letter to be your 15 MINUTE MUSICAL BIBLE. Make several copies of it: post one on your fridge, slip one under your pillow, have one transferred onto a t-shirt. You will want to refer back to this often during the 15 Minute Musical process. If you have questions along the way – check here first: the answer is probably here. There’s no reason for any part of this process to take you by surprise – it’s all here. It is a lot of information – you WILL forget some of it. Check back often to remind yourself of your deadlines, and of our expectations.

Essentially, the 15 Minute Musicals are in four stages: 1) assembling the collaborative teams; 2) setting the parameters you will use for writing your shows; 3) writing and assessing two drafts and a final script; 4) rehearsing and performing.

Step 1: Assembling the Collaborative Teams

About a month prior to the launch, we’ll collect from you any preferences you might have about people with whom you do and do not wish to collaborate; and don’t worry, your requests are completely confidential. We will first and foremost try to honor your choices about people you don’t want to work with. Then after that, we will try to honor everyone’s first or second choices for collaborators. Remember that in order to be considered in any of the three disciplines, you need to have completed all the Core assignments for that discipline, as well as received a “pass” from the lab instructor in the appropriate Lab.

Collaborative teams will not be announced prior to the official launch of the 15 Minute Musicals on Sun, Apr 5. This is to ensure against teams getting together and pre-conceiving of ideas for their musical. The whole premise underlying the 15 Minute Musical process is that you conceive and write these pieces as a team. The process begins with the creative impulse which your team receives as you begin to deal with the parameters together, not before.

All writers will be working with the same over-arching theme which will loosely tie all the musicals together. The theme will be general, like “money” or “last chances”. There will also be a few other parameters placed on each work which will be explained on the day of the launch.

These 15 Minute Musicals will be no longer than 15 minutes. We are very strict about this length.

Step 2: Setting the Parameters

We’ll begin the process with the “launch” on Sun, Apr 5 (at 12:00 pm SHARP: DO NOT BE LATE - we WILL start without you) by announcing who is on which collaborative team. You will also be asked to sign a Collaborative Agreement which will clarify ownership of the work you are about to create. If we have more than five writing teams, we will likely be splitting those teams into two PROGRAMS (Red and Blue) of three or more writing teams per Program.

Next, we will inform you of the basic cast parameters for all the musicals. All writing teams will be working with the same number of actors, and we will be clear about the general vocal ranges you should be writing for. Later in the process, when we actually cast the performers, we will need to be able to use the same group of actors for all of the 15 Minute Musicals in a particular Program, so you must adhere strictly to the cast size and vocal ranges that have been pre-determined.

NOTE: You will be required to write a 15 Minute Musical which features EACH member of your cast. There will be no "small" parts or "walk-ons" in your musical. That doesn't necessarily mean that every person in your cast needs a whole solo - but every performer must have their own moment to shine musically.

We will still have a little more work to do before you can begin brainstorming about your musical. You’ll need to know what theme all the 15 Minute Musicals will have in common, and we will be providing you with some parameters/catalysts to incorporate into your creative process.

Some time around 6:00 PM (or earlier, if we can manage it), you’ll have your collaborators, cast, creative parameters/catalysts; and you can begin to create your musical! You’ll probably want to meet with your collaborators for dinner/coffee beginning right away, because your first deadline is 10:00 pm on Tue, Apr 7 -- a little more than 48 hours away.

Step 3 - Writing and Assessing Drafts

The bookwriter of each team must submit an outline of your musical no later than 10:00 pm on Tue, Apr 7; it should be uploaded to your team directory on the 15MM Homepage on the NMI website AND emailed to admin@nmi.org AND emailed to your collaborators. Your outline MUST follow the standard format for an outline that has been used all year long. (You can find the “Instructions for Creating an Outline” document among the documents handed out at the Launch.)

The NMI dramaturge assigned to your musical will get back to you either via email or phone no later than noon on the Wednesday following your outline deadline, giving you either a greenlight or a request for a revised outline, or possibly a request for a new outline or idea. YOU MUST RECEIVE A GREENLIGHT ON YOUR OUTLINE IN ORDER TO BEGIN WRITING. Remember that stories are about people who want things (beginning), what they do to get what they want (middle) and whether they get it or not (end).

A gentle word of warning: please do not be surprised if your outline requires four or five or even six revisions before it receives a green light. We are well aware that the longer it takes to receive a green light, the less time the lyricist and composer have before their deadlines. However, experience has shown us that without a rock solid outline, the entire rest of the process is on shaky ground. As maddening as it is not to receive a green light, please trust the process.

NOTE: Once you have received a green light and your team progresses to the next steps, please bear in mind that it is your mission to ACCOMPLISH THE OUTLINE. At this point in the process, we have found that it is NOT useful for you to become "inspired" and to deviate from the outline because you feel you have a better idea for how to realize your 15 minute musical. If you start deviating from your outline, you run the risk of following your inspiration and winding up with a new idea that, although potentially promising, is structurally unrealized and this will ultimately slow down your process. If you feel your inspiration is so great that you simply cannot accomplish the green-lit outline - then write a new outline and submit it for green light before you proceed. More likely, the better advice would be to make a note of your inspiration, and save it for your next draft, and keep focused on your goal at this moment which is to ACCOMPLISH YOUR OUTLINE.

The Rough Draft of the Book:  A rough draft of the BOOK ONLY is due by 10:00 pm on Tue, Apr 14. The bookwriter will upload this draft to the website, and will also email a copy to admin@nmi.org, and to the lyricist and composer. The team will then collaborate on a proposed Song List which will be uploaded (and emailed) by 10:00 pm on Fri, Apr 17. NOTE: The Rough Draft and Song List do NOT require a green light, and will NOT receive feedback. These deadlines are a progress check-point to make sure your team is on schedule.

Your own team’s internal deadlines: We urge your team to have a frank discussion about your own deadlines, including when the lyricist and composer will provide each other with the first two or three songs. We don’t want to dictate that you write music first or lyrics first, and perhaps you’d prefer a combination. The important thing here is to ensure that no one on the team is waiting until the last second in order to begin creating. It’s up to you to figure out how to ensure that. We suggest, in the interests of time, that the composer writes music first for some of the songs, and the lyricist writes lyrics first for the rest, just so everyone can be writing as soon as possible...but that's a suggestion, and you're welcome to do whatever works best for your team.

Your team’s collaborative process: You will be required to sign a Collaboration Agreement before you can begin any work on your 15 Minute Musical. The purpose of this document is to define the function of each member of the team (bookwriter, lyricist, composer, or some combination). Please know that we expect you to take the division of these functions extremely seriously. You are certainly encouraged to have as much input as you want into the other areas on your project: if you are bookwriter, you should feel free to offer suggestions for song spotting; if you are a composer, you should feel free to suggest a particular line of dialogue; if you are a lyricist, you should feel free to argue strongly for a melodic or style choice. But remember this: the ultimate decision belongs to the person who has been designated to the function. The bookwriter has the final word on dialogue. The lyricist has the final word on lyrics. The composer has the final word on the music. Offer suggestions, request changes, argue your case as strongly as you can. But know that you have the final word only in your own arena. Also – do not offer suggestions if you are later going to desire credit for them. In this project, the bookwriter owns the book, the lyricist owns the lyrics and the composer owns the music, regardless of who actually contributed what.

Even more importantly: never, read NEVER, take it upon yourself to make a written change outside of your function.

Bookwriters: NEVER revise lyrics or music to suit your book. If you are responsible for incorporating lyrics into your document, make absolutely sure you have accurately reflected the lyricist’s choices. If you have been asked to supply new dialogue to be spoken during a song, make sure you respond quickly and collaboratively. Feel free to make suggestions for alterations, but do not make those alterations yourself and ask for permission later. Don’t do it. It is disrespectful.

Composers: NEVER revise the lyrics or dialogue to suit your music. If you have a suggestion or a request for a change – make the suggestion in person or by email, but do not type it into your score and THEN ask for permission. If you can’t set what you’ve been given – type “la la la” into your score, and ask the lyricist to provide replacement lyrics. Don’t type in alternate lyrics and tell your lyricist they are just placeholders. Don’t do it. It is disrespectful.

Lyricists: NEVER revise the music or the bookwriter's words to suit your lyric. You can let your bookwriter know you need a line of dialogue, and possibly type "(Insert dialogue about xyz)" - but do NOT write the dialogue yourself even as a placeholder. Don’t do it. It is disrespectful.

PLEASE NOTE that from this point forward, all DATES mentioned refer to the RED PROGRAM. Check the chart version of the schedule to see the BLUE PROGRAM dates (generally the day after the Red Program dates.)

ALSO NOTE that whenever the instructions below indicate that ALL COLLABORATORS are REQUIRED - it refers to all collaborators for either the RED or BLUE PROGRAM, depending on the deadline. RED PROGRAM writers are NOT required at BLUE PROGRAM deadlines, and vice versa (although they are always welcome.)

The Rough Draft of the Whole Musical: You will physically turn in the completed ROUGH FIRST DRAFT of your musical on Fri, May 1 at 6:00 pm. This version includes a complete script in the standard ANMT script/score format (refer to the Sample Format on the website), which includes script, lyric pages, and complete piano/vocal score. Lead sheets will not be accepted. (There will be ample opportunity in subsequent drafts to polish the piano vocal score – don’t fret.) The drafts will be evaluated between 6:00 pm and 11:00 pm – so please plan to stay for the entire session for your Program. Attendance is required of all writers.

At the Rough Draft Review session, each musical will be read (and sung) aloud by the NMI staff. (Yes – they will play all the roles, and sight-read and sight-sing through the whole thing. An event not to be missed – honest.) This review is, obviously, not about the performances, but about the clarity of the script and score. Feedback will be provided about the clarity of the manuscript itself: chord symbols, enharmonics, metronome markings, dynamics, cues, etc; and the formatting of the script/score (adhering to ANMT’s Format Guidelines) to ensure the integrated script/score is ready to go into rehearsal with the actors. There will be no artistic feedback at this session. Feedback will be limited to technical points which will allow the script and score to be playable and readable by actors and pianists. You will not be doing any rewriting at this time; just reformatting. To be clear: you are NOT to rewrite your draft between the Rough First Draft deadline and the First Draft deadline. You are to make ONLY the changes that are requested by the staff (formatting changes; or possibly key changes or changes to melodic lines if you have clearly written outside the range of your actors). If, for instance, you did not include a song in your Rough First Draft, you cannot slip it into your First Draft.

The First Draft: Your First Draft is due between 6:00 pm and 10:30 pm on Mon, May 4. For those scores/scripts we receive by 10:30 pm, we will schedule rehearsals. If your script and score are not turned in on time, we will not rehearse your project until after the next deadline (the Second Draft Submission). We really mean it – we will not accept late submissions. Just ask the teams from previous seasons. NOTE: This is a DROP-OFF deadline only: that means that as long as the submission shows up complete and on-time, we don’t care who delivers it. Your team can hire a delivery company if you like, but rest assured that even if you are not the person making the actual delivery, you are still responsible for making sure the delivery happens. NOTE: If you do arrange for a courier, call to make sure the delivery has actually been made - we have had issues with this in the past.

You must ALSO upload mp3 versions of your songs to the website so that the actors can use them for rehearsals. Those files should be uploaded to your project folder on the 15MM Homepage of the NMI website. Here are some helpful hints about mp3 rehearsal files:
- Find a STRONG instrument to assign to the vocal line so it can be clearly heard on the mp3. Reed instruments tend to work well, or a stringed instrument with an attack to it (violin). Organ or "Choral Ahh" sounds don't work well as they don't have distinct attacks.
- In general, provide TWO mp3s for each song: one with a clearly defined vocal line to follow, and one with accompaniment only.
- If you are writing a song with harmony, it helps a great deal to provide one mp3 with accompaniment only, one mp3 with all the parts together, and individual mp3s for each vocal line (that is: one mp3 for the soprano harmony line, one mp3 for the alto harmony line, etc.).

If you do not yet know how to create mp3 files from your scores, please make a point of finding out before the launch date.

A word of warning about deadlines: Don’t plan to finish writing on the afternoon of the deadline day, and meet your collaborators an hour before the deadline to start collating your submission. That is a recipe for disaster. When you are planning for your deadline, assume the worst. Assume that your printer will break down, you will get stuck in the worst traffic ever, and that your cat will die. That means you should plan to have your submission printed, collated, and ready to go by at least the day BEFORE your deadline, so all you have to do on the deadline day is make a delivery. Also: don’t turn responsibility over to one member of your team and then go away for the weekend. Make sure that your entire team is available on deadline days, so you can bail each other out when something goes wrong. (As mentioned above, we don’t care who actually delivers the draft; the whole team, one member of the team, or somebody’s Aunt Sadie: but bear in mind that if Aunt Sadie gets a flat tire and you’re not on call with a spare, your submission will be late and will not get rehearsed until the next deadline, and we'll all cut Aunt Sadie out of our wills.)

A group of sight-singers (not necessarily your final cast) will rehearse the First Drafts from Tue, May 5 through Fri, May 8. The first rehearsal is closed to writers. This is your time to relax, breathe, do your laundry, thank Aunt Sadie.

You're welcome to join us from the second rehearsal onwards. But bear in mind that your first draft will have very minimal rehearsal -- just enough so that the sight-singers can sing it and read it coherently. There will be no dramaturgy or re-writing of any kind during the rehearsal period: the intention will be to prepare to read and sing your project just exactly the way you have written it. That means typos and all, so be warned! We mean it – if your script says “Please tell me you lore me!” – then at the assessment, the actor will say “Please tell me you lore me!” If a lyric is missing, your singer will stop singing. If an accidental is missing on a note, your singer will sing the note as written – even if it is clearly wrong. This sort of thing is really, really painful to listen to – but it is the only way we have found to make the point of how important it is to make sure your submission is accurate.

First Assessment:  You’ll watch a presentation by the actors, and receive a First Assessment of your work from 2:00 pm to 11:00 pm on Sat, May 9. Your entire team MUST attend this ENTIRE marathon assessment for all the musicals in your Program. You will receive feedback from the actors, the music director, and the dramaturgical staff; and most importantly, you’ll be able to hear exactly what you have written and can evaluate for yourself what you think of it. You might toss out whole songs, or even whole characters. You might need to cut some material to stay within your fifteen minutes. Please bear in mind that this Assessment day will be a LONG one, as you’ll be expected to support your fellow writers and learn from their Assessments as well as from your own. Don’t make any other plans for this day, and remember to bring your Red Bull.

The Second Draft:  You’ll be given just over two weeks to complete the second draft, which will be due between 6:00 pm and 10:30 pm on Wed, May 27. There will be no rough draft deadline for this second draft – what you turn in is what will be rehearsed. There will be no new additional pages accepted after the drop-off date. NOTE: This is a DROP OFF ONLY.

It is our intention to cast your actual performers for this draft, so that you can have a chance to test out various keys and vocal ranges. The actors will rehearse from Thu, May 28 through Wed, Jun 3. You are invited and encouraged to attend all but the first of these rehearsals, but do not expect performances the first time you hear your work; there will not be any. The most important thing you can learn from these early rehearsals is: does your project make sense on the page? Do the actors instantly understand what they are reading, or are they struggling for meaning in the lines, or for notes in the score? How can you make your project easier to rehearse the next time around? Don’t expect the actors to be mind readers. If you want a line read angrily, write an angry line. Even though the purpose of rehearsing the draft is not to create a performance, if you want a clear presentation of what you meant when the assessment occurs, write clearly. This does not mean write instructions to the actors; it means make the dialogue speak for itself. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.

Second Assessment:  Your Second Assessment will take place on Sat, Jun 6 from 2:00 pm to 11:00 pm. Once again, everyone is required to attend the ENTIRE assessment session for your Program – and it will be another marathon. Please don’t grumble to yourself about the tediousness of sitting through detailed evaluations of musicals which you did NOT write. Instead, please pay close attention and you will find that you sometimes learn MUCH MORE by listening to someone else’s feedback than you do from listening to your own. You are not emotionally connected to someone else’s material, and therefore have no need to defend what’s been written. Because of this, you will often be able to take feedback that was given to other writers and apply it very effectively to your own work.

Rough Final Draft:  You’ll be given just ONE week to complete the final draft. A Rough Final Draft will be due on Wed, Jun 17 at 6:00 pm. The staff will do a cold read/sing-through of your material to check for your final timing. If your musical is running long, suggestions for possible cuts will be discussed. This session is scheduled to run until 11:00 pm, and all writers are required to attend the entire session.

NOTE: Once your show goes into rehearsal and gets staged by your director, we will have a run with the cast and time your show again. If it is running long at THAT point, any additional cuts will be chosen and implemented by your director and dramaturge. It's an important lesson to learn that once a director and cast get a hold of a script, it most definitely will get LONGER. For this reason, you will want to make sure that your show is coming in at UNDER 15 minutes if you can, or that you provide provisional cuts that can be implemented if the show is running long. But bear in mind that at this point in the process, the director will be the final word on these cuts.

ALSO NOTE: Once your show goes up in front of an audience, if the reactions of the audience make the show run longer than 15 mintues, you don't need to worry. We will NOT turn out the lights on you.

Final Performance Copy:  You will have A VERY SHORT WINDOW to finalize your script, and your Final Performance Script will be due between 6:00 pm and 10:30 pm on Sat, Jun 20. This is a DROP OFF ONLY.

Director Meetings:  After submitting your final draft, you will have an opportunity meet with your DIRECTOR to discuss your desires for the presentation of your musical. At least ONE member of your writing team must be available to meet (or Zoom) with your Director between 6:00 pm and 10:30 pm on Sun, Jun 21.

Rehearsals with your final cast will take place between Wed, Jun 24 and Mon, Jul 13. You are not required to attend rehearsals, but you are welcome (and are encouraged) to do so. We will try to give you a schedule of rehearsals in advance so that you can plan to attend the rehearsals specifically for your project – but we CANNOT guarantee that a particular rehearsal schedule will be adhered to. Schedules being what they are, we may have to work around specific scheduling difficulties of dramaturges, directors, music directors, and actors. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.

Wed, Jul 15. You are not required to attend rehearsals, but you are welcome (and are encouraged) to do so. We will try to give you a schedule of rehearsals in advance so that you can plan to attend the rehearsals specifically for your project – but we CANNOT guarantee that a particular rehearsal schedule will be adhered to. Schedules being what they are, we may have to work around specific scheduling difficulties of dramaturges, directors, music directors, and actors. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.

15 MINUTE MUSICALS SCHEDULE
Sun, Apr 5 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm 15 Minute Musicals Launch Day. Collaborative teams formed and agreements signed; theme announced; parameters detailed. Authors should plan to spend the rest of the evening AT LEAST to devise a story line.
**Required of all collaborators**
Tue, Apr 7 10:00 pm Deadline for bookwriter to upload outline - in correct ANMT format - and also email it to admin@nmi.org and all collaborators. DO NOT PROCEED WITHOUT GREENLIGHT ON OUTLINE
Tue, Apr 14 10:00 pm Deadline for bookwriter to upload rough draft of book only. There will be no feedback on the rough draft, and no greenlight is needed for the team to proceed to song spotting.
Fri, Apr 17 10:00 pm Deadline for the team to upload and email proposed song list. There will be no feedback on the song list, and no greenlight is needed for the team to proceed with writing the songs.
Fri, May 1 6:00 pm - 11:00 pm RED PROGRAM - Rough First Draft Due. You are to provide four (4) copies, correctly collated and hole-punched. Format must adhere to ANMT Format Guidelines as posted on the website. (Please bring EXTRA copies for your fellow writing teams.) ANMT Staff will review draft for formatting clarity and rehearsal-readiness (no dramaturgical feedback). All writers must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Sat, May 2 6:00 pm - 11:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Rough First Draft Due. You are to provide four (4) copies, correctly collated and hole-punched. Format must adhere to ANMT Format Guidelines as posted on the website. (Please bring EXTRA copies for your fellow writing teams.) ANMT Staff will review draft for formatting clarity and rehearsal-readiness (no dramaturgical feedback). All writers must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Mon, May 4 6:00 pm RED PROGRAM - First Draft Due. You are to provide eight (8) copies, correctly formatted, collated and hole-punched. ALSO UPLOAD SCRIPT, SCORE, and SOUND FILES TO YOUR WEBSITE FOLDER.
**Drop-off only**
Tue, May 5 6:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - First Draft Due. You are to provide eight (8) copies, correctly formatted, collated and hole-punched. ALSO UPLOAD SCRIPT, SCORE, and SOUND FILES TO YOUR WEBSITE FOLDER.
**Drop-off only**
Tue, May 5 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm RED PROGRAM - First Draft rehearsals begin. This first rehearsal is closed to authors. Authors welcome at subsequent rehearsals (but there will be no rewriting during this period.)
Wed, May 6 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - First Draft rehearsals begin. This first rehearsal is closed to authors. Authors welcome at subsequent rehearsals (but there will be no rewriting during this period.)
Sat, May 9 2:00 pm - 11:00 pm RED PROGRAM - Presentations and Assessments of First Drafts - dramaturgical feedback from ANMT staff. BRING COPIES OF YOUR SCRIPT/SCORE SO YOU CAN FOLLOW ALONG DURING THE FEEDBACK (and consider bringing extra copies for your fellow writers to follow along.) All teams must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Sun, May 10 2:00 pm - 11:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Presentations and Assessments of First Drafts - dramaturgical feedback from ANMT staff. BRING COPIES OF YOUR SCRIPT/SCORE SO YOU CAN FOLLOW ALONG DURING THE FEEDBACK (and consider bringing extra copies for your fellow writers to follow along.) All teams must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Wed, May 27 6:00 pm RED PROGRAM - Second Draft Due. You are to provide eight (8) copies, correctly formatted, collated and hole-punched. ALSO UPLOAD SCRIPT, SCORE, and SOUND FILES TO YOUR WEBSITE FOLDER.
**Drop-off only**
Thu, May 28 10:00 am RED PROGRAM - Second Draft Rehearsals begin. (Exact schedule TBA) Authors may attend these rehearsals beginning with the SECOND rehearsal. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.
Thu, May 28 6:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Second Draft Due. You are to provide eight (8) copies, correctly formatted, collated and hole-punched. ALSO UPLOAD SCRIPT, SCORE, and SOUND FILES TO YOUR WEBSITE FOLDER.
**Drop-off only**
Fri, May 29 10:00 am BLUE PROGRAM - Second Draft Rehearsals begin. (Exact schedule TBA) Authors may attend these rehearsals beginning with the SECOND rehearsal. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.
Sat, Jun 6 2:00 pm - 11:00 pm RED PROGRAM - Presentations and Assessments of Second Drafts - dramaturgical feedback from ANMT staff. BRING COPIES OF YOUR SCRIPT/SCORE SO YOU CAN FOLLOW ALONG DURING THE FEEDBACK (and consider bringing extra copies for your fellow writers to follow along.) All teams must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Sun, Jun 7 2:00 pm - 11:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Presentations and Assessments of Second Drafts - dramaturgical feedback from ANMT staff. BRING COPIES OF YOUR SCRIPT/SCORE SO YOU CAN FOLLOW ALONG DURING THE FEEDBACK (and consider bringing extra copies for your fellow writers to follow along.) All teams must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Wed, Jun 17 6:00 pm - 11:00 pm RED PROGRAM - Rough Final Draft Due. You are to provide four (4) copies, correctly collated and hole-punched. Format must adhere to ANMT Format Guidelines as posted on the website. (Please bring EXTRA copies for your fellow writing teams.) The ANMT staff will read/sing through the script for timing. If your script is over 15 minutes, you will be asked to make cuts before submitting the final copies. All teams must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Thu, Jun 18 6:00 pm - 11:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Rough Final Draft Due. You are to provide four (4) copies, correctly collated and hole-punched. Format must adhere to ANMT Format Guidelines as posted on the website. (Please bring EXTRA copies for your fellow writing teams.) The ANMT staff will read/sing through the script for timing. If your script is over 15 minutes, you will be asked to make cuts before submitting the final copies. All teams must attend the entire session.
**Required of all collaborators**
Sat, Jun 20 6:00 pm - 10:30 pm RED PROGRAM - Final Performance Script Due. You are to provide ten (10) copies, correctly formatted, collated and hole-punched. This is the draft which will be performed; no rewrites or new pages of any kind after this date. If your musical is running longer than 15-minutes at this point, any necessary cuts will be made by the Director.
**Drop-off only**
Sun, Jun 21 6:00 pm - 10:30 pm RED PROGRAM - DIRECTOR MEETINGS: An opportunity for writing teams to meet with their director to discuss their final draft prior to the final rehearsal process. At least ONE team member from each show MUST be available to meet. (Music Directors, Stage Managers, and Actors are NOT called.)
**Required of all collaborators**
Sun, Jun 21 6:00 pm - 10:30 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Final Performance Script Due. You are to provide ten (10) copies, correctly formatted, collated and hole-punched. This is the draft which will be performed; no rewrites or new pages of any kind after this date. If your musical is running longer than 15-minutes at this point, any necessary cuts will be made by the Director.
**Drop-off only**
Mon, Jun 22 6:00 pm - 10:30 pm BLUE PROGRAM - DIRECTOR MEETINGS: An opportunity for writing teams to meet with their director to discuss their final draft prior to the final rehearsal process. At least ONE team member from each show MUST be available to meet. (Music Directors, Stage Managers, and Actors are NOT called.)
**Required of all collaborators**
Tue, Jun 23 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Final rehearsals begin – schedule to be announced. Authors may attend these rehearsals. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.
**Required of all collaborators**
Wed, Jun 24 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Final rehearsals begin – schedule to be announced. Authors may attend these rehearsals. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.
**Required of all collaborators**
Wed, Jun 24 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm RED PROGRAM - Final rehearsals begin – schedule to be announced. Authors may attend these rehearsals. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.
Thu, Jun 25 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm BLUE PROGRAM - Final rehearsals begin – schedule to be announced. Authors may attend these rehearsals. NOTE that any requests or suggestions for revisions must go through and be approved by the director.
**Required of all collaborators**
Thu, Jul 16 1:00 pm - 9:00 pm Scheduled status review with John and Elise
Fri, Jul 17 10:00 am - 4:30 pm Scheduled status review with John and Elise
ALSO NOTE that whenever the instructions below indicate that ALL COLLABORATORS are REQUIRED - it refers to all collaborators for either the RED or BLUE PROGRAM, depending on the deadline. RED PROGRAM writers are NOT required at BLUE PROGRAM deadlines, and vice versa (although they are always welcome.)



10 STEPS OF COLLABORATION HAND-OUT


TO ACCOMPANY THE: COLLABORATION ASSIGNMENT

COLLABORATIVE PROCESS OVERVIEW

During the Core Curriculum season, we will be emphasizing ANMT’s recommended collaborative process.

ANMT’s recommended 10-Steps of Collaboration:

1. Conception (Blueprinting)

2. Outlining/re-outlining/greenlight

3. Rough Draft

4. Song-spotting

5. Writing songs and lyrics/Adjusting book to set up songs

6. Collaboration on presentation (repairing prosody/assembling the presentation/Formatting)

7. Submit/present First Draft

8. Response to Feedback

9. Outline current draft/outline proposed revisions/greenlight

10.Revisions

These 10 steps can be further broken down into four basic parts:

PART A - Steps 1, 2 & 3 - Blueprinting

1. Conception

2. Outlining/re-outlining/greenlight

3. Rough Draft

The process begins with the team getting together to discuss the idea and agree on a basic story-line. The bookwriter then writes up the actual outline and goes through the outline revision process until the outline receives a green light. The bookwriter then writes a rough draft of the book only, following the blueprint of the outline.

PART B: Steps 4 & 5 - Drafting

4. Song-spotting

5. Writing songs and lyrics/Adjusting book to set up songs

In the next part of the process, the team gets back together to discuss the spots in the rough draft that could be converted to songs, and the song writing team devises a plan for those songs. The songwriters then write the songs, and deliver them to the bookwriter so the bookwriter can revise the book to incorporate the songs.

PART C: Steps 6 & 7 - Presenting

6. Collaboration on presentation (repairing prosody/assembling the presentation/Formatting)

7. Submit/present First Draft

In the next part of the process, the team gets back together to review the completed material and plan any revisions or tweaks (i.e. repairing prosody) prior to presentation. The team also plans the method of presentation, and decides how the material will be prepped for presentation.

PART D: Steps 8, 9 & 10 - Revising

8. Response to Feedback

9. Outline current draft/outline proposed revisions/greenlight

10.Revisions

In the final part of the process, the team gets back together to discuss the feedback they received and make a plan for responding to the feedback. The team then completes the revisions, and repeats the steps in Part C before re-presenting the material.